Egyptian protesters penetrate barrier at President Morsi’s palace

From the time ‘Morsi’ granted himself unlimited powers to protect the nation and power to constitute without authoritative oversight, many protestors in herds have been demonstrating against him.

On Friday, thousands of protestors gathered around his palace and got through the blockages, climbing onto the army tanks that had been deployed to save the property. The opposition leaders had earlier rejected the proposed dialogue by the Islamist president to bring an end to a crisis that has led to violence on the streets.

Demonstrators cut the fence wires and entered the palace, shouting, “We want this regime to end.” Many protestors even went on to kiss the security officials while chanting ‘peaceful, peaceful’ and ‘Leave, Leave.’ On the other hand, while Morsi did offer a few concessions to finish the country’s political crisis in a national speech he made on Thursday, nothing was substantial. He refused to withdraw a dubious constitution drafted by his followers, which has given him unconditional powers. The opposition refused to talk unless he refuted the referendum and met their demands. They want him to annul the verdict completely.

“The National Salvation Front is not taking part in the dialogue,” said Ahmed Said, the opposition leader. He is also the head of the liberal Free Egyptians Party.

This clash resulted in the death of 7 people, while more than 350 people were injured. The funeral of six Morsi supporters was held by Islamists at Cairo’s al-Azhar mosque on November 23, 2012.

The Front’s coordinator and a Nobel peace laureate and, Mohamed ElBaradei, appealed to the national forces to turn away from an offer that he claimed was “based on arm-twisting and burden of a fait accompli.” Several other peace and justice foundations feel that the only solution to end this crisis is dialog, rather than more clashed and consequently, bloodshed.

The crisis in Egypt is now in its third week, with anger mounting on all fronts. This chaos has also uncovered the difference in opinion between the two groups of the country – the Islamists who the army had suppressed for decades and their rivals who fear that the extremists aim to snub their voices and completely eradicate all forms of social freedom.

This unrest in the country is reducing its hope for stability and economic recovery. This crisis is the worst since Morsi assumed office in June, following the upheaval of Mubarak. The nation comprising of 85 million people caught in this unrest are anxiously looking forward to the end of this crisis, as it is costing their livelihood and jobs. Moreover, the longer this crisis continues, the more difficult it will become for the Morsi government to manage the huge budget deficit, along with avoiding the issue of balance of payments. Many other measures directed towards lifting the country’s economy have taken a backseat due to the ongoing situation.